A online sale Map high quality of Days (Miss Peregrine's Peculiar Children) outlet online sale

A online sale Map high quality of Days (Miss Peregrine's Peculiar Children) outlet online sale

A online sale Map high quality of Days (Miss Peregrine's Peculiar Children) outlet online sale
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The instant bestseller!
• New York Times bestseller
• USA Today bestseller
• Wall Street Journal bestseller


A Map of Days reveals Ransom Riggs at the peak of his powers, leaving loyal fans ravenous for more.” – NY Journal of Books

Having defeated the monstrous threat that nearly destroyed the peculiar world, Jacob Portman is back where his story began, in Florida. Except now Miss Peregrine, Emma, and their peculiar friends are with him, and doing their best to blend in. But carefree days of beach visits and normalling lessons are soon interrupted by a discovery—a subterranean bunker that belonged to Jacob’s grandfather, Abe.

Clues to Abe’s double-life as a peculiar operative start to emerge, secrets long hidden in plain sight. And Jacob begins to learn about the dangerous legacy he has inherited—truths that were part of him long before he walked into Miss Peregrine’s time loop.

Now, the stakes are higher than ever as Jacob and his friends are thrust into the untamed landscape of American peculiardom—a world with few ymbrynes, or rules—that none of them understand. New wonders, and dangers, await in this brilliant next chapter for Miss Peregrine’s peculiar children. Their story is again illustrated by haunting vintage photographs, now with the striking addition of full-color images interspersed throughout for this all-new, multi-era American adventure.

Review

Praise for A Map of Days:

“The best-selling  Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children series returns, this time with a new story arc that takes place in America…[with] weirdly wonderful characters.” – I09

The stakes are higher than ever as Jacob and his friends are thrust into the untamed landscape of American peculiardom” – Tor.com
 
A Map of Days reveals Ransom Riggs at the peak of his powers, leaving loyal fans ravenous for more.”   NY Journal of Books
 
Riggs reinvigorates his best-selling series, expanding the peculiar world and history, while drawing parallels to contemporary hot-button issues…This series is a big deal!” –  Booklist
 
Praise for the #1 bestselling Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children series: 

“A tense, moving, and wondrously strange first novel. The photographs and text work together brilliantly to create an unforgettable story.” —John Green, #1  New York Times bestselling author of  Turtles All the Way Down and  The Fault in Our Stars

“Readers searching for the next Harry Potter may want to visit Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children.” —CNN

“With its  X-Men: First Class-meets-time-travel story line, David Lynchian imagery, and rich, eerie detail.” — Entertainment Weekly

“‘Peculiar’ doesn’t even begin to cover it. Riggs’ chilling, wondrous novel is already headed to the movies.”— People

“[A] thrilling, Tim Burton-esque tale with haunting photographs.”— USA Today Pop Candy

About the Author

Ransom Riggs is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of the Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children novels. Riggs was born on a farm in Maryland and grew up in southern Florida. He studied literature at Kenyon College and film at the University of Southern California. He lives in Los Angeles with his wife, bestselling author Tahereh Mafi, and their family.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Prologue

 

 

Never have I doubted my soundness of mind as often as I did on that first night, when the bird-woman and her wards came to save me from the madhouse. That’s where I was going, pinned between beefy uncles in the back seat of my parents’ car, when a wall of peculiar children seemed to leap directly from my imagination into the driveway before us, aglow in our high beams like a formation of angels.

We skidded to a stop. A wave of dust erased everything beyond our windshield. Had I conjured their echo, some flickering hologram projected from deep within my brain? Anything seemed more believable than my friends being here, now. Peculiars had a way of making anything seem possible, but a visit from them was one of the few impossibilities of which I could still be certain.

It had been my choice to leave Devil’s Acre. To go home again, where my friends couldn’t follow. I had hoped that in returning I might sew together the disparate threads of my life: the normal and the peculiar, the ordinary and the extraordinary.

Another impossibility. My grandfather had tried to sew his lives together too and failed, estranged in the end from both his peculiar family and his normal one. In refusing to choose one kind of life over the other, he had doomed himself to lose both—just as I was about to.

I looked up to see a figure moving toward us through the clearing dust.

“Who the hell are you?” my dad said.

“Alma LeFay Peregrine,” she replied, “Ymbryne Council leader pro tem and headmistress to these peculiar children. We’ve met before, though I don’t expect you’d remember. Children, say hello.”

 

 

Chapter One

 

 

 

It’s strange, what the mind can digest and what it resists. I had just survived the most surreal summer ­imaginable—skipping back to bygone centuries, taming ­invisible monsters, falling in love with my grandfather’s time-arrested ­ex-girlfriend—but only now, in the unexceptional present, in suburban Florida, in the house I’d grown up in, was I finding it hard to believe my eyes.

Here was Enoch, splayed upon our beige sectional, sipping Coke from my dad’s Tampa Bay Buccaneers tumbler; here was Olive, unstrapping her lead shoes to float ceilingward and ride circles on our fan; here were Horace and Hugh in our kitchen, Horace studying the photos on the fridge door while Hugh rustled for a snack; here was Claire, both mouths slack as she gazed at the great black monolith of our wall-mounted television; here was Millard, my mother’s decor magazines rising from the coffee table and splitting in midair as he skimmed them, the shape of his bare feet imprinted into our carpet. It was a mingling of worlds I’d imagined a thousand times but never dreamed possible. But here it was: my Before and After, colliding with the force of planets.

Millard had already tried to explain to me how it was possible they could be here, apparently safe and unafraid. The loop collapse that had nearly killed us all in Devil’s Acre had reset their internal clocks. He didn’t quite understand why, only that they were no longer in danger of sudden catastrophic aging if they stayed too long in the present. They would get older one day at a time, just like I did, their debt of years seemingly forgiven, as if they hadn’t spent most of the twentieth century reliving the same sunny day. It was undoubtedly a miracle—a breakthrough unprecedented in peculiar history—and yet how it had come to be was not half as amazing to me as the fact that they were here at all: that beside me stood Emma, lovely, strong Emma, her hand entwined with mine, her green eyes shining as they scanned the room in wonder. Emma, whom I’d so often dreamed about in the long, lonely weeks since my return home. She wore a sensible gray dress that fell below the knee, hard flat shoes she could run in if she had to, her sandy hair pulled back into a ponytail. Decades of being depended on had made her practical to the core, but neither the responsibility nor the weight of years she carried had managed to snuff the girlish spark that lit her so brightly from the inside. She was both hard and soft, sour and sweet, old and young. That she could contain so much was what I loved most about her. Her soul was bottomless.

“Jacob?”

She was talking to me. I tried to reply, but my head was mired in dreamy quicksand.

She waved at me, then snapped her fingers, her thumb sparking like struck flint. I startled and came back to myself.

“Hey,” I said. “Sorry.”

“Where’d you go?”

“I’m just—” I waved as if raking cobwebs from the air. “It’s good to see you, that’s all.” Completing a sentence felt like trying to gather a dozen balloons in my arms.

Her smile couldn’t mask a look of mild concern. “I know it must be awfully strange for you, all of us dropping in like this. I hope we didn’t shock you too badly.”

“No, no. Well, maybe a little.” I nodded at the room and everyone in it. Happy chaos accompanied our friends wherever they went. “You sure I’m not dreaming?”

“Are you sure I’m not?” She took my other hand and squeezed it, and her warmth and solidness seemed to lend the world some weight. “I can’t tell you how many times, over the years, I’ve pictured myself visiting this little town.”

For a moment I was confused, but then . . . of course. My grandfather. Abe had lived here since before my dad was born; I’d seen his Florida address on letters Emma had kept. Her gaze drifted as if she were lost in a memory, and I felt an unwelcome twinge of jealousy—then was embarrassed for it. She was entitled to her past, and had every right to feel as unmoored by the collision of our worlds as I did.

Miss Peregrine blew in like a tornado. She had taken off her traveling coat to reveal a striking jacket of green tweed and riding pants, as if she’d just arrived on horseback. She crossed the room tossing out orders. “Olive, come down from there! Enoch, remove your feet from the sofa!” She hooked a finger at me and nodded toward the kitchen. “Mr. Portman, there are matters which require your attention.”

Emma took my arm and accompanied me, for which I was grateful; the room had not quite stopped spinning.

“Off to snog each other already?” said Enoch. “We only just arrived!”

Emma’s free hand darted out to singe the top of his hair. Enoch recoiled and slapped at his smoking head, and the laugh that burst out of me seemed to clear some of the cobwebs from my head.

Yes, my friends were real and they were here. Not only that, Miss Peregrine had said they were going to stay awhile. Learn about the modern world a bit. Have a holiday, a well-earned respite from the squalor of Devil’s Acre—which, with their proud old house on Cairnholm gone, had become their temporary home. Of course they were welcome, and I was inexpressibly grateful to have them here. But how would this work, exactly? What about my parents and uncles, who at this very moment Bronwyn was guarding in the garage? It was too much to grapple with all at once, so for the moment I shoved it aside.

Miss Peregrine was talking to Hugh by the open fridge. They looked jarringly out of place amid the stainless steel and hard edges of my parents’ modern kitchen, like actors who had wandered onto the wrong movie set. Hugh was waving a package of ­plastic-wrapped string cheese.

“But there’s only strange food here, and I haven’t eaten for centuries!”

“Don’t exaggerate, Hugh.”

“I’m not. It’s 1886 in Devil’s Acre, and that’s where we had breakfast.”

Horace burst from our walk-in pantry. “I have completed my inventory and am frankly shocked. One sack of baking soda, one tin of sardines in salt, and one box of weevil-infested biscuit mix. Is the government rationing his food? Is there a war on?”

“We eat a lot of takeout,” I said, walking up beside him. “My parents don’t really cook.”

“Then why do they have this whomping great kitchen?” said Horace. “I may be an accomplished chef de cuisine, but I can’t make something from nothing.”

The truth was that my father had seen the kitchen in a design magazine and decided he had to have it. He tried to justify the cost by promising he would learn to cook and then throw legendary dinner parties for the family—but, like a lot of his plans, it fizzled after a few cooking lessons. So now they had this hugely expensive kitchen that was used mostly to cook frozen dinners and heat up day-old takeout. But rather than say any of that, I shrugged.

“Surely you won’t perish of hunger in the next five minutes,” Miss Peregrine said, and shooed both Horace and Hugh from the kitchen. “Now, then. You were looking a bit wobbly earlier, Mr. Portman. Are you feeling all right?”

“Better every minute,” I said, a bit embarrassed.

“You may be suffering from a touch of loop lag,” said Miss Peregrine. “Somewhat delayed in your case. It’s absolutely normal among time travelers, especially those who are new to it.” She was speaking to me over her shoulder as she moved through the kitchen, peeking inside each cabinet. “The symptoms are usually inconsequential, though not always. How long have you been feeling dizzy?”

“Only since you all got here. But really, I’m fine—”

“What about leaking ulcers, bunion clusters, or migraine headaches?”

“Nope.”

“Sudden mental derangement?”

“Uh . . . not that I can remember?”

“Untreated loop lag is no laughing matter, Mr. Portman. People have died. Hey—biscuits!” She grabbed a box of cookies from a cabinet, shook one into her hand, and popped it into her mouth. “Snails in your feces?” she asked, chewing.

I choked back a snicker. “No.”

“Spontaneous pregnancy?”

Emma recoiled. “You’re not serious!”

“It’s only happened once, that we know of,” said Miss Peregrine. She set the cookies down and fixed me with a stare. “The subject was male.”

“I’m not pregnant!” I said a little too loudly.

“And thank goodness for that!” someone shouted from the living room.

Miss Peregrine patted my shoulder. “It sounds as if you’re in the clear. Though I should have warned you.”

“It’s probably better you didn’t,” I said. It would have made me paranoid, not to mention that if I’d spent the last month sneaking pregnancy tests and checking my feces for snails, my parents would have long before banished me to an asylum.

“Fair enough,” said Miss Peregrine. “Now, before we can all relax and enjoy one another’s company, some business.” She began pacing a tight circle between the double ovens and the prep sink. “Item one: safety and security. I’ve scouted the perimeter of the house. All seems quiet, but appearances can be deceiving. Is there anything I should know about your neighbors?”

“Like what?”

“Criminal histories? Violent tendencies? Firearm collections?”

We had only two neighbors: ancient Mrs. Melloroos, a ­wheelchair-bound octogenarian who only left her house with the help of a live-in nurse, and a German couple who spent most of the year elsewhere, leaving their Cape Cod–style McMansion empty except during the winter.

“Mrs. Melloroos can be kind of nosy,” I said. “But as long as no one’s being flagrantly peculiar in her front yard, I don’t think she’ll give us any trouble.”

“Noted,” said Miss Peregrine. “Item two: Have you felt the presence of any hollowgast since you returned home?”

I felt my blood pressure spike at her mention of the word, which had crossed neither my mind nor my lips in several weeks. “No,” I said quickly. “Why? Have there been more attacks?”

“No more attacks. No sign of them whatsoever. But that’s what worries me. Now, about your family—”

“Didn’t we kill or capture them all in Devil’s Acre?” I said, not ready to change the subject away from hollowgast so quickly.

“Not quite all. A small cadre escaped with some wights after our victory, and we believe they absconded to America. And while I doubt they’ll come anywhere near you—I daresay they’ve learned their lesson—I can only assume they’re planning something. An abundance of caution couldn’t hurt.”

“They’re terrified of you, Jacob,” Emma said proudly.

“They are?” I said.

“After the thrashing you gave them, they’d be stupid not to be,” said Millard, his voice ringing out from the edge of the kitchen.

“Polite persons do not spy on private conversations,” Miss Peregrine huffed.

“I wasn’t spying, I was hungry. Also, I’ve been sent to ask you not to hog Jacob. We came an awfully long way to see him, you know.”

“They missed Jacob a lot,” Emma said to Miss Peregrine. “Nearly as much as I did.”

“Perhaps it’s time you addressed everyone,” Miss Peregrine said to me. “Make a welcome speech. Lay out some ground rules.”

“Ground rules?” I said. “Like what?”

“They’re my wards, Mr. Portman, but this is your town and your time. I’ll need your help keeping everyone out of trouble.”

“Just be sure to feed them,” said Emma.

I turned to Miss Peregrine. “What were you saying before, about my family?”

They couldn’t stay prisoners in the garage forever, and I was getting anxious about how we were going to deal with them.

“You needn’t worry,” Miss Peregrine said. “Bronwyn has the situation well in hand.”

The words had hardly left her lips when a percussive, wall-­rattling crash sounded from the direction of the garage. The vibrations sent glasses toppling from a nearby shelf to the floor, where they shattered.

“That sounds like a distinctly out-of-hand situation,” said Millard.

We were already running.

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4.8 out of 54.8 out of 5
4,102 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

D_Notice
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Feels forced
Reviewed in the United States on November 4, 2018
Read all three of the first series to my son and we enjoyed them immensely. We also picked up the book of short stories and enjoyed that as well. This outing is proving very hard to get through. The book is incredibly forced. Whereas the first series felt like something... See more
Read all three of the first series to my son and we enjoyed them immensely. We also picked up the book of short stories and enjoyed that as well. This outing is proving very hard to get through. The book is incredibly forced. Whereas the first series felt like something that grew out of the inspiration of the photos Ransom Riggs had collected, this book feels like he decided that the only way to write it would be to follow the formula for the first ones exactly. There are characters who appear in the story for the sole reason of showing you the picture he''d found. Worse yet is that Jacob''s voice has been overtaken by Ransom Riggs'' own. Being a first person narrative this teenager talks an awful lot like a middle age man than an awkward kid stumbling his way through an adventure and his first outing with true love. The third strike against this story is a complete lack of cadence. As I read allowed a well written story I can often anticipate who will be speaking next and the mood and inflections of the characters before I get to the descriptors. In this book I''m have a very difficult job doing that, with random characters blurting out just to remind you that they are along for the ride, or yelling when you think they should be whispering. Of course, this isn''t too big of a problem because Riggs relies heavily on "he said, she said," back and forth, over and over. Oh, and then there are the dialects. Riggs is writing accents from new places without understanding them. For example, there is a rhythm in how folks talk in the south. And he just don''t seem to understand it. It''s a whole lot more than just putting some twang into what you''re saying.
39 people found this helpful
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Joe Da Rold
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Lacks the magic of the previous books.
Reviewed in the United States on November 13, 2018
“Map” continues the saga of Miss Peregrine’s peculiar children, with Jacob home in Florida, and Miss P. and her wards rescuing him from his parents who are about to institutionalize him. Jacob is intent on learning more about his deceased grandfather Abe, a peculiar with... See more
“Map” continues the saga of Miss Peregrine’s peculiar children, with Jacob home in Florida, and Miss P. and her wards rescuing him from his parents who are about to institutionalize him. Jacob is intent on learning more about his deceased grandfather Abe, a peculiar with many secrets. Jacob’s relationship with Emma continues to develop but runs into obstacles when she confesses that she is still in love with Abe. This story thread gets tedious halfway through the book. Although it has its moments, the latest novel lacks the magic and excitement of the first three. Fans of the series will enjoy the book, but nobody should read this without having read the first three books; there are just too many back stories to be aware of. The postcards that were so weirdly special in the other books are now very ordinary, with Riggs stretching his story to match the photos, instead of the reverse. On the plus side is the stopover at the Flamingo Manor, the terror at the high school, and the discovery of Noor, a young peculiar with an amazing talent. Riggs has indicated this is the start of a new trilogy to be set in America. Let’s hope he tightens up his plotting.
21 people found this helpful
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Iniysa
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Favorite book in the series so far!
Reviewed in the United States on October 11, 2018
I loved the book! With the exception of a slow beginning I think this was my favorite book in the series so far. SPOILER ALERT SPOILER ALERT The Emma/Jacob SHIP has always been a little weird since Emma and Abe were a very real thing. I love that we... See more
I loved the book! With the exception of a slow beginning I think this was my favorite book in the series so far.

SPOILER ALERT SPOILER ALERT

The Emma/Jacob SHIP has always been a little weird since Emma and Abe were a very real thing. I love that we really delved into this in this book and I think I might actually SHIP Noor/Jacob.

Miss Peregrine freaking out then his peculiar friends turning on him really made what I hope is coming next, a possibly even bigger event.

Jacob leaves them all and we learn from H that there is a book that''s sounds very prophetic: Apocryphon. Seven peculiars who will emancipate peculiardom. There is a secret organization with state of the art tech and helicopters who are after the seven. We know Noor is one of said seven.

H called Jacob: Baby Moses in the reeds. Think about Moses story, then think about Jacob and his journey... is he one of the seven? Is he meant to find and guide them?

Then Noor took his hand...

I can''t wait until the next book!

END SPOILERS

Shipping Note: The first book I got was beaten until the pages were visible in the binding. I blame whoever decided to put the book in a regular envelope, not a box. Amazon promptly sent me a second book in perfect condition and I returned the first book.
18 people found this helpful
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SnozzWanger
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A bit of a stumble but finds its pace
Reviewed in the United States on October 7, 2018
It''s first edition contains a few copy edit misses which are a bit jarring early on and seem oddly sloppy. Riggs seems a bit rusty as well, and takes a while to find his rhythm with the story. Once he does, however, it''s an adventure worthy of the Peculiar world, though... See more
It''s first edition contains a few copy edit misses which are a bit jarring early on and seem oddly sloppy. Riggs seems a bit rusty as well, and takes a while to find his rhythm with the story. Once he does, however, it''s an adventure worthy of the Peculiar world, though less under the wings Miss Peregrine than ever before.
Like trying to re-fold a highway or ordinance map, ''A Map of Days'' can seem pretty complicated at times, jumping from timeline to timeline up and down the Eastern Seaboard of the United States, popping into the 1930''s from the 1960''s and out the back door to the 2010''s (and doubtless I''m not exactly accurate here). You can either try to keep it sorted out and make it make sense, or you can just accept it as it is, and just go with it.
Regardless, ''A Map of Days'' is a fun read that brings growth to old friends, introduces intriguing new characters and begins to explore a new continent and its new "rules and traditions and taxonomies and histories". Ultimately we are left with the promise of many more adventures from the Peculiar world of one Jacob Portman... and the suspicion that the dot on the horizon is quite possibly a furious Peregrine keeping a (worried) eye on the goings on below.
14 people found this helpful
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Kindle Customer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Mixed feelings
Reviewed in the United States on November 2, 2018
The first three books made a perfect trilogy. In the end, good triumphs over evil, the good guys are set free, and the boy gets the girl. Why write a fourth book? Of course, I couldn''t pass up the adventures of our favorite characters, or the swollen writing OK Mr.... See more
The first three books made a perfect trilogy. In the end, good triumphs over evil, the good guys are set free, and the boy gets the girl. Why write a fourth book?
Of course, I couldn''t pass up the adventures of our favorite characters, or the swollen writing OK Mr. Riggs. As usual the book is superbly written, but I had the feeling that I was witnessing a pilot for a TV show. The book ends about one chapter short of a good ending point.
This book is an excellent read, but unless the next one is already set to be published, I feel a distinct lack of closure.
7 people found this helpful
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Mayhem
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
What was the point of this book?
Reviewed in the United States on November 17, 2018
This was THE WORST Peculiar Children’s book I’ve ever read yet I’m giving it 2 stars for effort. The plot, if there truly was one, was so serpentine that I can only envision disaster for the remainder of the series. Assuming it ever ends and I truly hope it does sooner... See more
This was THE WORST Peculiar Children’s book I’ve ever read yet I’m giving it 2 stars for effort. The plot, if there truly was one, was so serpentine that I can only envision disaster for the remainder of the series. Assuming it ever ends and I truly hope it does sooner rather than later. How can something so catastrophic actually be stale to read? The children ran amok and argued. Now Jacob has split from the group as a lone avenger on a dangerous mission to save a young peculiar girl that he’ll obviously fall in love with. He’ll save her and they’ll all live happily ever after. THE END.
8 people found this helpful
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Sarah L. Gruwell
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
great to see the series continued, but a few stumbles along the way
Reviewed in the United States on December 22, 2018
When I heard that Riggs was writing a new Peregrine trilogy, my anticipation was through the roof. I was ready and willing to dive back into the world of Peculiar-dom with vigor. So as soon as the new book hit Amazon, I put that pre-order in ASAP and got reading as soon as... See more
When I heard that Riggs was writing a new Peregrine trilogy, my anticipation was through the roof. I was ready and willing to dive back into the world of Peculiar-dom with vigor. So as soon as the new book hit Amazon, I put that pre-order in ASAP and got reading as soon as I got it. For the most part, Riggs has hit a home run again. There are a few blips that bugged me, but at the prospect of more Peculiar works, I’m still game.

I adored seeing Peculiar-dom explored in America. In ways it’s a far darker place than Wight/Hollow haunted Europe as it’s Peculiar on Peculiar cruelty. The way history developed in America was FAR different than Europe due to the continuing absence of certain people and the history of racism in 19th century and early 20th America. I was kept enthralled by this history and world building, a specialty that Riggs seems to excel in.

Exploring Abe’s background and getting more details and what he really did in Peculiar America made for fascinating background and plot elements. Rigg’s suspenseful storytelling never lets up as Abe and his cohorts travel north from Florida on new missions and discoveries into Abe’s past. I couldn’t help but be pulled forward chapter by chapter as the story was masterfully told.

I also enjoyed exploring Jacob’s continuing development. Riggs does a great job in showing how Jacob starts to chafe at his status in the European Peculiar world and the continuing restrictions placed by the Ymbryne overseers of that world. He’s finding his footing in his powers and his identity as a Peculiar all while still showing traits true to his true age, that of a teenager. He’s still head strong, impulsive, and at times, childish. However, I can start to see the man he’s going to become.

The one aspect I didn’t get as much enjoyment out of was Jacob’s traveling companions. Not that I didn’t enjoy more of his cadre of Peculiar friends from across the pond but it almost felt kinda random, their inclusion into the story. While elements of the story did hinge on the peculiarities of the specific individuals, I feel like the story could have been told with less individuals to put in an opinion. It almost felt like the author was just trying to keep this new book tied to the first trilogy rather than incorporating those characters into a new story arc.

I felt like the story would have been served better if he’d shed his travel companions faster. By the end, we do have Jacob firmly on his new journey; yet I felt he could have started on that new journey sooner with more exploration given to his new situation and companions. The whole thing with him and Emma just really drove me up a tree. While a part of his growing up and shedding his old identity, it felt like an add on detail that I could have done without.

Despite this little quibble, I felt this was a great new addition to the Peculiar series. With Jacob firmly on his new journey and with more maturity under his belt, I feel like his continuing adventures will keep me entertained for far into the future. I look forward to exploring Peculiar-dom in American in far greater details and can’t wait for book two!
7 people found this helpful
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Naz
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I looove the first 3 books, but...
Reviewed in the United States on May 13, 2020
This book lacked the magic and charm of the first 3. Jacob Portman our hero does soo many things out of character. He’s never been a selfish person that just goes off half cocked. There needs to be some sort of motivation that feels real as to why he has a big... See more
This book lacked the magic and charm of the first 3.
Jacob Portman our hero does soo many things out of character. He’s never been a selfish person that just goes off half cocked.
There needs to be some sort of motivation that feels real as to why he has a big fat ego in this story.

In books 1-3 Jacob and Emma have a solid relationship. Emma was done with her pining for Abe at the end of book 1. But this book starts off with her not liking Jacob and still in love with Abe (despite no evidence of that in books 2 or 3) probably because the author wants a new love interest, which is going to be the Indian POC at the end of the book.

The book also seemed preachy about how America sucks. I’m not a fan of that.

It felt like I was reading a very very long filler novel written by someone who was given Ransom Riggs outline Of story ideas and haphazardly put them together. Many new characters added and then discarded, adding nothing to the story.

Also, Jacob learns nothing new about his powers. He does not progress but regress as a character in this story. In fact all of the characters personalities seemed a bit off.
Having said that I will read book 5. Maybe that will be better. If not, then I’d say stick to the first 3 books as that trilogy was excellent.
3 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

SophXQuinn
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Genius way in which to write
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 17, 2019
I was so excited to see that there would be more books to this series. I absolutely loved the first three, I think it is a genius way in which to write, including vintage photographs and weaving a story through them. When we left Jacob he had come home to Florida in which...See more
I was so excited to see that there would be more books to this series. I absolutely loved the first three, I think it is a genius way in which to write, including vintage photographs and weaving a story through them. When we left Jacob he had come home to Florida in which the peculiar followed suit and came to find him ending on what I thought was a lovely open ending. Well it did not stop there which I was about to find out. Oh how I have missed Ransoms writing. A Map of Days sat on my to be read shelf at the bottom as I was determined to read those before it. I flew through the other books in order to get to read it! It was very good motivation! On opening the first few crisp pages I noticed straight away that it was in colour. Yes colour! Then I started reading. It all went a bit downhill from there. The book itself was quite slow to start I thought, I could not tell where the story was going which in this case was not good. It just felt all a bit washed out. Where is the adventure? The drama? The banding together to become a brilliant group of kids that kick ass but keep there sanity? The character development was lacking a little and I started to not like Jacob as much. He''s supposed to be the hero?! It was so disappointing to not connect to this as much as I was hoping. My only thought is that this is a lead up to the next couple of books, setting the tone and the story to then go onto something magical. I am still giving it a three stars as the concept is still amazing to me and it was enjoyable to read but just felt it lacked a lot of oomph, I am glad that this was not the first in the series as I feel most would put it down without a second thought. Fingers crossed the next is a bit more impressive.
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Wen
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A very good book to follow on to the next
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 20, 2020
Starting a map of days just felt getting a warm hug from lost friends. I have so much love and appreciation for this series on a personal level. Getting back into it just felt so welcoming. Not only does this book expand peculiar history ( this time in America) but also the...See more
Starting a map of days just felt getting a warm hug from lost friends. I have so much love and appreciation for this series on a personal level. Getting back into it just felt so welcoming. Not only does this book expand peculiar history ( this time in America) but also the life of Abe. Riggs continues expanding this world and just delves deeper into peculiardom. That was massive part of the story along side the subplot of the character relationships. I really enjoyed the story! I think the scenes were set perfectly. The more creepy ones were definitely my favourite. Mystery turned to ominous and ominous turned to danger. Still keeping the overall metaphor of WW2 this book also combined racism and colonialism into the American history of peculiardom. This really does create such a powerful balance in the story and just added another narrative for the next book. However as the book went on I just saw similarities with hollow city which took some of the enjoyment away. It didn’t feel like I was reading something new but towards the end it picked up originality for this series. Overall it’s very faced paced at keeps you on your toes. It’s a very good book. I never really considered of Jacob’s grandfathers life as big mystery after he left the loop. I think this was just because I got lost in this world Riggs created and the discoveries that Jacob made in the first book. Riggs really takes his readers on this journey with Jacob. Jacob is an easy character to relate to and that’s powerful along side the over all plot of this series. But in this book there are so many bread crumbed trails about Abes life after he left the loop. Jacob was just beginning to feel like he found himself and that he fitted in somewhere but at the same time he’s lost again, and feels he doesn’t know his grandfather even more so. He discovers so many more secrets, as does Emma I feel this element brought them closer. I think that’s a good balance to the story. In this story Jacob rebels and follows his own path and I feel by him doing so, it makes him feel closer to his grandfather but also opens a can of worms with Emma.Chapter 18 however really pissed me off because of how they all treated Jacob and turned their back on him, after all he’s done for them.
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LucyP
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Another good read!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 2, 2020
A Map of Days is more of a drawing together of the events of the proceeding books in the series, in my opinion. It is not so action packed and dynamic as the previous books, but more a taking stock of what has happened so far, with promises of more to come in the future. I...See more
A Map of Days is more of a drawing together of the events of the proceeding books in the series, in my opinion. It is not so action packed and dynamic as the previous books, but more a taking stock of what has happened so far, with promises of more to come in the future. I found the first half quite slow, before the pace built up again, but always leaves you wanting more. It is still an excellent read and I think the slowing down of pace in this book is a clever move, because I am sure the next book due out (Jan 2020) will take the pace up again. I am not going to spoil the story by telling what happens in the book, but some very clever and interesting hooks are there.
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Amazon Customer
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It stopped in mid storyline
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 22, 2020
I strongly dislike books that just stop in mid storyline. A trilogy of books each complete in its own right is ok but in this case the author is saying “ If you want to find out what happens in the next minute you will have to buy my next book”. I don’t think that is...See more
I strongly dislike books that just stop in mid storyline. A trilogy of books each complete in its own right is ok but in this case the author is saying “ If you want to find out what happens in the next minute you will have to buy my next book”. I don’t think that is playing fair with the reader.
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Bubble
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Amazing books! This is the 4th in series
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 19, 2018
Absolutely love these books, had the first 3 for ages and didn''t even know this one existed but it''s a must and ALL of the books (miss peregrine, hollow city and library of souls) are so good, well worth a read! Totally different reading experience to what I''m used to but...See more
Absolutely love these books, had the first 3 for ages and didn''t even know this one existed but it''s a must and ALL of the books (miss peregrine, hollow city and library of souls) are so good, well worth a read! Totally different reading experience to what I''m used to but in a good way, has pictures all the way through all the book of characters and places described, all actual photos the author has collected and wrote the books around/incorporated into it!
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